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Canelo's manager sees Alvarez as bigger threat to Floyd than Cotto

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The manager for Mexican superstar Canelo Alvarez sees his fighter as a serious threat to Floyd Mayweather, and doesn't believe that Mayweather has many options for September, either.

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Eddy Reynoso, the manager for Canelo Alvarez, believes that his fighter has a legitimate chance to land the September 14 fight against Floyd Mayweather, citing a lack of options, and a chance to beat him, as he's a bigger fighter than Miguel Cotto, who gave Mayweather some problems in 2012.

"Floyd is seeking success, and Saul is seeking glory and all of that would be at stake if they fought. I also believe Floyd does not have that many names to choose from [for his next fight]. He should keep in mind that Canelo is a junior middleweight and Cotto is not," Reynoso said.

Mayweather-Alvarez is probably the biggest fight in boxing that can actually be made -- in that they aren't promoted by rival companies that won't do business together. Alvarez, with Golden Boy, reportedly has a few more demands than does the average Mayweather opponent, and Floyd has some issues with that.

But last year, Mayweather did give Cotto more than he's given the likes of Robert Guerrero, Victor Ortiz, and Juan Manuel Marquez, as Cotto brought a notable fan base to the fight, as would Alvarez. If Canelo wants more than Cotto -- and, frankly, he should, as he's a bigger star right now than Cotto was in May of last year -- then that could be the real hang-up.

One thing Reynoso is definitely right about is the size. Alvarez isn't much taller than Floyd, but we're talking about a legitimate, young, natural junior middleweight who carries that 154 and rehydrates fairly significantly overnight. Cotto was a very small junior middle, a guy who had come up from 140 and 147, and he was aging. That's not to say that Mayweather wouldn't or shouldn't be the favorite, but it does present an intriguing angle that might actually mean something during the fight, as opposed to just before, when we tend to look for ways that Floyd may conceivably struggle with an opponent.