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Floyd Mayweather being sued by Hasim Rahman's sons

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The sons of Hasim Rahman have filed suit against Floyd Mayweather in connection to the increasingly infamous "doghouse" sparring sessions at his gym.

Ethan Miller

The sons of former heavyweight champion Hasim Rahman are suing Floyd Mayweather on a number of charges after being featured on Showtime's "All Access" in the controversial "doghouse" sparring sessions. Mayweather Promotions and Showtime have also been named in the suit.

From ESPN.com:

Hasim Rahman Jr., who is in his early 20s, and 18-year-old brother Sharif Rahman, both amateur boxers, allege battery, tortious assault, false imprisonment, negligence, defamation, unjust enrichment and for having their names and likeness used without permission, among other charges, in the 21-page lawsuit filed Thursday in Nevada's Clark County District Court.

Sharif took a notable beating from Donovan Cameron in one sparring session, leading to Hasim Jr challenging Cameron to another session, which continued on for 31 minutes until Cameron couldn't continue. Mayweather later claimed when sent before the Nevada State Athletic Commission that the sparring sessions were dramatized for TV, and that they were not the dangerous marathons that were being portrayed.

This lawsuit alleges that Mayweather "knowingly misrepresented facts" in that Nevada hearing, which many felt was a sham in the first place, given that only Mayweather was even asked about the sessions, and was sent away with a lollipop and a pat on the head, more or less.

Undoubtedly some out there who think they're members of "The Money Team" because they like Floyd Mayweather or bought a baseball cap with an unbendable brim will see this as the Rahmans looking to gain fame and fortune off the back of poor ol' Floyd Mayweather, but if Mayweather was not presenting the whole truth at the Nevada hearing, then the reality is that these are dangerous standards for any gym. This is all in the early stages of litigation, though, so we'll see where it goes.