clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Andre Berto's Power 105.1 Breakfast Club interview

New, 4 comments

Andre Berto stopped by Power 105.1 last week in New York to talk about his fight with Mayweather, making a lot more money than is being reported, and where he sees he career going from here.

Fresh off his defeat by Floyd Mayweather, Andre Berto made some media rounds, even stopping by The Breakfast Club to give the rundown on what's going on with him now, where he's been, and where he's going.

Berto started off by talking about the Mayweather fight, saying he was surprised that Floyd did so much "running." He was pressed on the issue, suggesting that he should've known Mayweather's fighting style by now, and although he says he did, he still expected Floyd to be much more aggressive coming off of the Pacquiao fight that didn't please many fans.

Andre continue to talk about how he expected more out of Mayweather in that fight, but admitted that the man is just a truly slick defensive fight that's just plain hard to put hands on. Finally, he says he got frustrated during the fight, which prompted the verbal exchanges between Floyd and himself. When his $4M purse was brought up, Andre scoffed and said that he actually made much more than that reported figure for the fight, while suggesting he also got a cut of the PPV as well. Towards the end of the video Berto casts some light suspicion on the Mayweather IV story, saying he's never seen a 38-year old boxer be in such sharp physical condition before.

Finally, Berto reflects on the perils that come with earning a ton of money at a very young age, saying he thinks his partying, drinking, etc. contributed to his recent string of injuries. He says he's now cleaned up his act and lives a more strict lifestyle, taking better care of his body. He also talks about what comes after his boxing career, saying he has a lot of other skills that can earn him a living outside of being a professional boxer. Berto is still weighing his options but expects to be fully dedicated to boxing for at least the next three years before calling it quits and moving on to other endeavors.